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What is a Blog?

A blog is a regularly updated website published on the Web. It is an excellent way to share your thoughts, creativity, and expertise. The blog or web-log began as an only journal or diary option for people who wish to share their thoughts publically. More information about origins of blogging is found here.

Below is a list of blogging platforms: Updated 11/2016

Anchor

 

Blog.com ? check bad?

http://blog.com/

Contentful

No one knows how they’re going to want to display their articles a few years down the line, so Contentful provides a way to separate your content from your design. It calls this an “API-first” approach, so your content is stored on their servers and you can call it into any design or platform as you like. So if you want to build a completely different site in a few years time, it’s easy to bring everything in as it’s set up to be portable from the start.

 

Jekyll

Jekyll takes your raw text files, which may be written in Markdown, if you like, and turns them into a robust static site to host wherever you want. It’s the engine behind GitHub Pages, which means you can host your blog on there for free.

Making your blog with Jekyll avoids the need to work with technicalities such as databases, upgrades and so on, so there are fewer things to go wrong, and you can build something completely from scratch.

http://www.livejournal.com

ne of the veterans of this list, LiveJournal (like Blogger) started life in 1999. Perhaps because of its age, it rather blurs the lines (the site says “wilfully”) between blogging and social networking.

The result is more of a community that affords you your own space, but that also very much encourages communal interaction. It is possible to fashion something more private, but to get the most out of LiveJournal, you need to be prepared to delve into discussion as much as writing.

http://www.wordpress.org

If the folks over at WordPress are to be believed (and they seem suitably trustworthy sorts), it now ‘powers’ over a fifth of the internet.

It’s easy to see why: on WordPress.com, you can rapidly create a new blog entirely for free, with a reasonable amount of customisation; alternatively, most web hosts provide WordPress as a free single-click install, and more info on what’s possible there can be found at WordPress.org.

Newcomers might find WordPress a touch bewildering initially, but it’s the best free option for anyone wanting a great mix of power, customisation and usability.

Tumblr

To some extent, Tumblr feels a bit like a half-way house between WordPress and Twitter. It offers more scope than the latter, but tends to favour rather more succinct output than the former.

Decent mobile apps make it easy to submit content to a Tumblr blog from anywhere, though, and it’s reasonably easy to customise your theme to make it your own.

Tumblr also has a strong social undercurrent, via a following model combined with notes and favourites. Although be mindful that the service has quite a few porn bots lumbering about, which may give the faint-of-heart a bit of a shock should they check every favourite off of their posts.

Bebee.com

https://www.bebee.com/producer

 

Blogger

You’d hope with a name like ‘Blogger’ that Blogger would be a decent free service for blogging. Fortunately, it is. Sign in with your Google ID, and you can have a blog up and running in seconds, which can then be customised with new themes. It is, however, a Google service, and so be a touch wary, given how abruptly that company sometimes shuts things down that millions of people were happily using.

Medium

Medium is the brainchild of Twitter’s founders, and appears to be their attempt to do for ‘longreads’ what they once did for microblogging. The result is a socially-oriented place that emphasises writing, although within an extremely locked-down set-up. It’s a place to blog if you want your words to be taken seriously, and if you favour a polished, streamlined experience. But if you’re big on customisation and control, look elsewhere.

Posthaven

 https://posthaven.com/

Simple, easy blogs for $5 a month, forever.

Websites come and go.

This is one made to last forever.

Svbtle

Describing itself as a “blogging platform designed to help you think”, Svbtle is fairly similar to Medium in approach. It again strips everything right back, resulting in a bold, stylish experience that pushes words to the fore. It could easily become your favourite blogging platform for the act of writing, but it again relies on you also wanting something extremely simple and not caring a jot

Typepad

Typepad is a blogging platform that provides an easy-to-use interface for beginning and experience bloggers. The platform provides a wide range of themes to choose from as well as plugins so you can make your blog your own. A key drawback to using Typepad is that all of the blogs are hosting by them on their server, so you do not have the option to use the platform with your own blog host. It is also a platform that makes editing code difficult because it is geared towards bloggers who may not be as confident in editing HTML code for example.

https://tinypress.co/

at github

Weebly

Weebly bills itself more as a website-creation system than something for solely creating a blog. It’s based around drag-and-drop components, which enable you to quickly create new pages.

However, blogging is also part of the system, and you get access to customisable layouts, a bunch of free themes, and the usual sharing features you’d expect, to spread your words far and wide.

Postach.io

Postach.io claims it’s the “easiest way to blog”. It’s from the people behind Evernote, and, naturally, is deeply integrated into their system.

Essentially, you just connect a notebook to Postach.io and then tag notes as ‘published’ to make them public.

However, you get some customisation, too, including a bunch of themes, the means to embed content from other sites, Disqus commenting, and the option to instead use Dropbox for storing content.

Pen.io

approach is also rather different from its contemporaries. Unusually, it doesn’t require a login — instead, you define a URL for a post and set a password.

Images can be dragged into place, and you can create multi-page posts using a tag. And that’s about it.

Really, it’s a stretch to call Pen.io a blog in the traditional sense, but it’s a decent option for banging out the odd sporadic post, especially if you don’t want any personal info stored.

Ghost

Something slightly different for our final entry. Unlike the others on this list, Ghost is only free if you download and install it yourself; use the Ghost site and you pay on the basis of traffic.

However, this system differentiates itself in other important ways: it’s entirely open source, and while writing you get a live preview of how your post will end up.

You need to be technically minded for this one, then, but it’s a worthy alternative to WordPress if you’re happy to get your hands dirty and have your own web space that’s awaiting a blog.

HubPages

http://hubpages.com/

Discover and create original, in-depth, useful, media-rich pages on topics you are passionate about.

Sett

THE BLOG THAT BUILDS YOUR AUDIENCE

SquareSpace

All over television with beautiful and encouraging ads, SquareSpace offers a nice solution for the business owner in need of a web presence. Get online quickly with a free trial, setup a cool design and start attracting clients – that’s the motto. If a more complex blogging platform were snowboarding, SquareSpace would be skiing, in the pie wedge stance 🙂

Stats:

  • Recommended for: Individual and business blogs and websites
  • Founded: January 2004
  • Founder: Anthony Casalena
  • Total users: ?
  • Pros: Elegant designs setup with a couple of clicks.
  • Cons: Less customization – you’ll pay for things that may come free at a place like WordPress, cannot count blog posts, not a good software for accessing and managing blog posts.
  • Costs: 14-day free trial with plans from $8 and up afterwards
  • My verdict: Less hands-on than WordPress but arguably better advertising and accessibility – Squarespace gets your business site up quickly. A good quick solution.

    Wardrobe

 

http://wardrobecms.com/

A Minimal Blogging Application.

Wardrobe is a minimalistic blogging application. Wardrobe attempts to make blogging simple and enjoyable by utilizing the latest technologies and keeping the administration as simple as possible with the primary focus on writing.

Alturnatives

Quora.com

YouTube

LinkedIn Pulse

Browse at Drupal.org

  • Recommended for: Blogging, Content Management, Web Applications
  • Founded: January 2001
  • Founder: Dries Buytaert
  • Total users: 1 million users and 30K developers
  • Pros: 22,900 free add-ons, free and premium themes via the Drupal Theme Garden
  • Cons: Quite involved, not ideal for beginners
  • Costs: ?
  • My verdict: Fun for developers and bloggers with a real interest in building code.

Polarsteps

won’t be a good fit for all types of blogs, but if you’re blogging about your travels then it’s a unique option to consider. Designed specifically for travelling, it charts your locations along an interactive map that allows your readers to explore each of the locations you’ve visited. If you’d rather spend more time away from your screen, then not to worry: Polarsteps will use your smartphone to chart your journey, no internet connection or GPS signal required. Whether you want to share your adventures with the entire world or securely with just a handful of people, Polarsteps is a great solution for any travel journal blog

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